Ink Coverage

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  David Blatner 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #69518

    Barry Monks
    Member

    I export from InDesign to PDF using the Daily Mail’s AMNO-FLEXO-NEWSPAPER color profile but Acrobat shows excessive ink coverage and I have to convert again in that. What’s going on?

  • #69522

    Opo One
    Member

    I have no knowledge of the colour profile you are mentioning but simply attaching a colour profile is not going to change the ink weight within a file. We adjust ink weight manually before sending ads.

  • #69560

    Barry Monks
    Member

    The correct ink weight appears to be included in the profile when converted in Acrobat. So why can’t InDesign do this?

  • #69561

    David Blatner
    Keymaster

    If you have, for example, a CMYK image that has the incorrect ink coverage (like 400% cmyk ink in one area), and you place that in InDesign, then InDesign will simply pass that CMYK value through into the PDF. That is what the “Convert to Destination (Preserve Numbers)” feature does. If you need to cross-render to a different cmyk (so that all your cmyk images get converted) it is trickier but possible.

    Have you tried the Ink Limit feature in InDesign’s Separations Preview panel?

  • #69609

    Barry Monks
    Member

    Thanks, David. The Ink Limit preview certainly shows the areas of excess. But how do I reduce them within InDesign without re-profiling individual images? It seems to me that overall Ink Coverage is [or should be] part of the profile; If I export with no color conversion then convert in Acrobat then it’s fine.

  • #69610

    Eugene Tyson
    Member

    I’d adjust the ink limit in the problematic individual images in photoshop.

  • #69612

    Barry Monks
    Member

    Thanks,Eugene; but I use the same images in many different publications each of which has it’s own prescribed PDF Job Options and colour profiles. I can’t create and then tailor each image individually for all these. If Acrobat can fix it at a stroke, why can’t InDesign?

  • #69614

    David Blatner
    Keymaster

    Acrobat can do all kinds of things that InDesign cannot. However, in this case: what do you think Acrobat is doing? If there is 350% CMYK coverage in a CMYK image, the only solution you have is to cross-render that to a different CMYK.

    HOWEVER, the real solution here is much simpler: You should be using RGB images in InDesign, not CMYK. Especially if you are planning on using the same image in more than one publication (with different printing needs), RGB is the choice of experts. Then you never have to worry about ink limits because the RGB image is always converted to the proper profile when you create your PDF.

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